Categories
Art

Reign Fancy

Fancy

Fancy is such an interesting word. In my mind when I hear the word fancy I think dressed up, but fancy means a lot more than just how nice something looks.

Fancy is defined as: elaborate in structure or decoration, also created from the imagination rather than from life. It comes from the word Fantasy, which comes from Greek phantasia ‘imagination, appearance’, later ‘phantom’, from phantazein ‘make visible’. 

When you are fancy, you decorate or rather make with your imagination. To be fancy is to make your imagination visible.

Reign

Reign is the quality of prevailing and overcoming opposing forces, to live with sovereignty which is a state of self governing.

Reign Fancy was painted using my imagination. Imagination is the action of forming new ideas, or images or concepts of external objects not present to the senses.

Intuitive Painting

Bringing my imagination to life through the use of my intuition, I created this painting without knowing exactly what it was going to be.

I first began with a lotus flower shape, and slowly added layers of colors while flipping the canvas different directions. Slowly I started to see a woman figure from the flower and realized it was an indigenous fancy dancer.

  • Fancy
  • Fancy

Fancy Dancing

When I was young we would go to powwows and I would dance the fancy dance category. Fancy dance, or shawl dance was first a men’s dance but after a while women adapted it. The women’s fancy shawl dance represents the opening of a cocoon when the butterfly emerges. The shawl is usually the most extravagant piece. The fringed shawls are colorful and flashy, often featuring embroidery or ribbon work. The fringe on the shawl have movement that coincides with the dancer.

The fancy dancers shawl represents the wings of the butterfly. The butterfly is a metaphor for transformation and hope; across cultures, it is a symbol for rebirth and resurrection, for the triumph of the spirit and the soul over the physical prison, the material world. Among the ancients, is an emblem of the soul and of unconscious attraction towards light.

When I dance I imagine that I am swirling energy up into the ether vibrating peace, love, unity, harmony, balance and bliss. I feel supported by the energy of those who came before me, the energy of lives lived on this land. The rituals of everyday life, charging the land with intention.

When I dance I feel uplifted by the energies around me, and it feels like a new dawn.

Spirit Name, Raining in the Dawn woman

At age 11 my parents sent my sister and I to North Dakota. While out there we receive our Spirit names from our tribes medicine woman in a naming ceremony. As my name was being presented to me, our giiwa had to take a moment to explain that it was unusual for our Ojibwe Spirit names to be the same as our Christian names. She said that Creator told my mother to name me Raine Dawn because that was who I am. My Ojibwe name is Raining in the Dawn woman. When I think of what Raining in the Dawn means about who I am… there is no shortage of synchronicities, it is who I am.

As this painting emerged I felt the true meaning of raining in the dawn… rising above into a new dawn. Dawn is the beginning of a phenomenon or period of time, especially one considered favorable. Dawn is to come into existence.

When I think of raining I think of the purification rain brings. I think of the ions in the atmosphere and how they change before and after a storm. How they rebalance themselves to bring back equilibrium.

The title evolved through all of this as the painting unfolded. I decided to use the word reign over rain because I’ve always had the inclination to think of the word reign just as much as rain. Being able to prevail in any situation, to have a growth mindset, is one of the most important things in my life.

Lets all reign in the dawn of our own lives.

If you’re interested in purchasing a print of this painting you can go to my Etsy Account here.

Categories
Wine and Painting Party

Dream Catchers

Dream catchers are sacred circles. Being that I am Ojibwa, also known as Chippewa, dreamcatchers have always been a party of my life.  Growing up, there were dream catchers hanging on every wall, in every window, and in the car. We even had dream catcher earrings and christmas tree ornaments. I remember growing up making dream catchers in school and sunday school.  Though I don’t remember being taught exactly where they came from. I simply remember that they catch bad dreams and let the good dreams go through.

So as I got older I started reading and researching dream catchers and found that they were believed to have been created by the Anishnabe tribe, which is where the Chippewa began.  The Anishnabe people originated on the east coast, but migrated west after a prophecy about a disaster.  When they traveled west, there were groups of people who wanted to stay and adapt to the places they were. So there became different bands of tribes. My tribe is the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewas, in North Dakota.

So, there was said to be a time in Anishnabe history when the people were being tormented by nightmares. There was an elder who had a vision of a spider’s web in the morning dew, and knew each drop of dew was a bad dream the spiders web had caught the night before. As the sun rises in the dawn, the bad dreams are transformed by the light and evaporated. The people began crafting these beautiful ornaments to clear their space of bad dreams. Over time grandfathers and grandmothers created them for newborn children and were hung above the cradleboard to give the infants peaceful, beautiful dreams.

So now we know a little more about the dream catcher paintings we recently made! It was such a blast! Thank you four for a wonderful evening! Your dream catchers are truly unique and each of you did an awesome job!

10448819_766953180023717_3764783116958342570_n

 

10380881_766953366690365_7081119933010685343_n